Sudans at a Precarious Stage

Following the secession of the North and South Sudan, both nations have entered into a critical phase that requires responsiveness and solemnity. The constancy of the two Sudans shoulders heavy responsibility, provided the ties they would establish is not only vital for peaceful coexistence of the peoples of both Sudans, but rather for the stability of the entire Horn of Africa region.

Following the secession of the North and South Sudan, both nations have entered into a critical phase that requires responsiveness and solemnity. The constancy of the two Sudans shoulders heavy responsibility, provided the ties they would establish is not only vital for peaceful coexistence of the peoples of both Sudans, but rather for the stability of the entire Horn of Africa region.

Needless to say, the Government of Eritrea has from the outset been standing by the South Sudan people’s right to self-determination. The right to self-determination is a nonexchangeable and yet fundamental right of all nations. As a trailblazer of the struggle of South Sudan, the Sudanese People Liberation Movement–SPLM–upheld in the course of its struggle the principle to ensuring the rights and equality of the people of South Sudan within the context of a united Sudan. Indeed, in the light of an objective perspective, separation of the peoples of the South and North Sudan would serve the interests of none. The best choice, as yet, is a new Sudan that respects the rights and equality of the people of South Sudan as fi rst-class citizen. Derailed by internal and external factors, however, the long-cherished end has now spawned the contretemps on the edge.

These scenarios have already given rise to grave concerns as to where they will forge ahead. Howsoever the separation of the two Sudans comes into effect, unresolved matters that could undesirably impact their relations are up in the air. The unity of all nationalities of the Sudan, equitable allocation of resources and robust management are the major challenges posed before the new government of Sudan. South Sudan is opulent in a number of resources. Resources, however, turn out to be a curse when employed improperly. Whether the people of South Sudan will manage to make judicious use of the resources or not is defining for its stability and fate. Independent line is another issue at stake. Achieving sovereignty does not merely purport rising a flag high. If full independence of the forthcoming regime is not guaranteed, the sacrifi ce the people of South Sudan paid for the right to self-determination will be of no avail: the situation may grow into a recipe for disaster in the region.

Impending are thus endless and perturbing questions in the wake of the secession of the two Sudans. In such unwarranted state of affairs, political forces of both Sudans,  admitting of the new reality, need to pursue a desired orientation through careful and serious handling of the emergent situation; and thus, it would be necessary for the international community at large, but particularly those parties that are interested in the stability of this region, to cooperate through constructive engagement.